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Rumors are like ripples in a cornfield. They are ephemeral, but they do indicate which way the wind is blowing.

By no stretch of even the most considerable imagination could this book be considered historically objective. It has the typical pro-union bias that is tempered only be its anti-military bias and its desire to promote class dissenion as a vehicle of social change. If the “occupy” movement ever needs a troubadour they should find a ready hand in Williams. All of those objections having been lodged it is an anecdotal history and as such certain episodes do get reported that are out of sync with the prejudices of the author so in spite of his best efforts to draw a shade over the truth a little light gets in around the edges.

A people’s history of the Civil War : struggles for the meaning of freedom      David Williams  United States History Civil War, 1861-1865 Social aspects  New York : New Press : Distributed by W.W. Norton & Co., c 2005 Hardcover. 1st ed. and printing. xii, 594 p. : ill. ; 24 cm. Includes bibliographical references (p. [543]-565) and index. Clean, tight and strong binding with clean dust jacket. No highlighting, underlining or marginalia in text.  VG/VG

Historian David Williams has written the first account of the American Civil War though the eyes of ordinary people—foot soldiers, slaves, women, prisoners of war, draft resisters, Native Americans, and others. Richly illustrated with little-known anecdotes and first-hand testimony, this  narrative moves beyond presidents and generals to tell a new and powerful story about America’s most destructive conflict.

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