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Nursing is an art: and if it is to be made an art, it requires an exclusive devotion as hard a preparation, as any painter’s or sculptor’s work; for what is the having to do with dead canvas or dead marble, compared with having to do with the living body, the temple of God’s spirit? It is one of the Fine Arts: I had almost said, the finest of Fine Arts. ~Florence Nightingale

There is no doubt about the selfless heroism of Clara Barton and I think that those who have nursed the ill and wounded of any war are owed even greater thanks than those who go about the daily ministry of mercy that is nursing. Clara Barton was no the only union nurse nor did only the north have nurses. In the roll call of honor such Southern women as Kate Cumming and Phoebe Yates Pember must be honored as well. The Civil War Women Blog has much more history on these ladies and their efforts.

A woman of valor : Clara Barton and the Civil War      Stephen B. Oates  United States , History , Civil War, 1861-1865 , Medical care  New York : Free Press ; Toronto : Maxwell Macmillan Canada ; New York : Maxwell Macmillan International, c 1994 Hardcover. 1st. ed., later printing. x, 527 p. : ill., map ; 25 cm.  Includes bibliographical references (p. 389-511) and index. Clean, tight and strong binding with clean dust jacket. No highlighting, underlining or marginalia in text. VG/VG

When the Civil War broke out, Clara Barton wanted more than anything to be a Union soldier, an impossible dream for a thirty-nine-year-old woman, who stood a slender five feet tall. Determined to serve, she became a veritable soldier, a nurse, and a one-woman relief agency operating in the heart of the conflict.  Stephen B. Oates, drawing on archival materials not used by her previous biographers, has written the first complete account of Clara Barton’s active engagement in the Civil War.

By the summer of 1862, with no institutional affiliation or official government appointment, but impelled by a sense of duty and a need to heal, she made her way to the front lines and the heat of battle. Oates tells the dramatic story of this woman who gave the world a new definition of courage, supplying medical relief to the wounded at some of the most famous battles of the war — including  Antietam, Fredericksburg, Battery Wagner, the Wilderness, Spotsylvania, and Petersburg.

Under fire with only her will as a shield, she worked while ankle deep in gore, in hellish makeshift battlefield hospitals – a bullet-riddled farmhouse, a crumbling mansion, a windblown tent. Committed to healing soldiers’ spirits as well as their bodies, she served not only as nurse and relief worker, but as surrogate mother, sister, wife, or sweetheart to thousands of sick, wounded, and dying men.

Her contribution to the Union was incalculable and unique. It also became the defining event in Barton’s life, giving her the opportunity as a woman to reach out for a new role and to define a new profession. Nursing, regarded as a menial service before the war, became a trained, paid occupation after the conflict. Although Barton went on to become the founder and first president of the Red Cross, the accomplishment for which she is best known, A Woman of Valor convinces us that her experience on the killing fields of the Civil War was her most extraordinary achievement.

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