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“He was constantly on the lines, riding with firm graceful seat, looking every inch a soldier. Like General Lee, he was rarely much attended. One staff officer and a single courier formed his usual escort, and often he made the rounds alone. Of ordinary height, his figure was slight but athletic, his carriage erect, and his dress plainly neat. His expression was grave but gentle, his manner so courteous as almost to lack decision, but was contradicted by rigidity about the mouth and chin, and bright flashing eyes that even in repose told another tale. In moments of excitement he never lost self-control nor composure of demeanor, but his glance was sharp as an eagles, and his voice could take a metallic ring” Capt. William E. Cameron describing General Ambrose P. Hill

Maj. Gen. Cadmus Marcellus Wilcox, 1824-1890, half-length portrait, facing left, in Confederate uniform

Maj. Gen. Cadmus Marcellus Wilcox, 1824-1890, half-length portrait, facing left, in Confederate uniform

The class of 1846 : from West  Point to Appomattox : Stonewall Jackson, George  McClellan, and their brothers New York : Warner  Books, c 1994 John C. Waugh Military art and  science United States History 19th century  Hardcover. 1st. ed. and printing. xvi, 635 p. :  ill. ; 24 cm. Includes bibliographical references  (p. 586-606) and index. Clean, tight and strong  binding with clean dust jacket. No highlighting,  underlining or marginalia in text.  VG/VG   

Portrait of Maj. Gen. Darius Nash Couch, officer of the Federal Army

Portrait of Maj. Gen. Darius Nash Couch, officer of the Federal Army

No single group of men at West Point – or possibly any academy – has been so indelibly written into history as the class of 1846. The names are legendary: Thomas “Stonewall” Jackson, George B. McClellan, Ambrose Powell Hill, Darius Nash Couch, George Edward Pickett, Cadmus Marcellus Wilcox, and George Stoneman. The class fought in three wars, produced twenty generals, and left the nation a lasting legacy of bravery, brilliance, and bloodshed.

Inscribed on verso: The last charge at the Battle of Five Forks, April 1st 1865. Here Warren made his last charge. his horse was shot under him. the rebels had surrendered and were massed about the tree depicted in the sketch when an aide of Sheridans came up and relieved Genl. Warren from command. Of course if this had not been done, Warren would have had the credit of the victory he had justly won. Sheridan and the ring he belongs to intends to grab all laurels no matter at the cost of what injustice. Alfred R. Waud [battlefield artist]

Inscribed on verso: The last charge at the Battle of Five Forks, April 1st 1865. Here Warren made his last charge. his horse was shot under him. the rebels had surrendered and were massed about the tree depicted in the sketch when an aide of Sheridans came up and relieved Genl. Warren from command. Of course if this had not been done, Warren would have had the credit of the victory he had justly won. Sheridan and the ring he belongs to intends to grab all laurels no matter at the cost of what injustice. Alfred R. Waud [battlefield artist]

This fascinating, remarkably intimate chronicle traces the lives of these unforgettable men – their training, their personalities, and the events in which they made their names and met their fates. Drawing on letters, diaries, and personal accounts, John C. Waugh has written a collective biography of masterful proportions, vivid and engrossing in its re-creation of these brilliant figures and their pivotal roles in American history.

Portrait of Maj. Gen. George Stoneman, officer of the Federal Army

Portrait of Maj. Gen. George Stoneman, officer of the Federal Army

 

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