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War means fighting. The business of the soldier is to fight. Armies are not called out to dig trenches, to throw up breastworks, to live in camps, but to find the enemy and strike him; to invade his country, and do him all possible damage in the shortest possible time. This will involve great destruction of life and property while it lasts; but such a war will of necessity be of brief continuance, and so would be an economy of life and property in the end. To move swiftly, strike vigorously, and secure all the fruits of victory is the secret of successful war… Stonewall Jackson

John Crawford Vaughn, raised Tennessee's first Confederate regiment  before Tennessee had seceded and was promoted to brigadier general in 1862

John Crawford Vaughn, raised Tennessee’s first Confederate regiment before Tennessee had seceded and was promoted to brigadier general in 1862

The last Confederate general : John C. Vaughn and his East Tennessee Cavalry Minneapolis : Zenith Press, 2009 Larry Gordon Generals Confederate States of America Biography, Vaughn, John Crawford, 1824-1875 Military leadership Hardcover. 1st. ed. xii, 260 p. : ill., maps ; 23 cm. Includes bibliographical references (p. 229-240) and index.  Clean, tight and strong binding with clean dust jacket. No highlighting, underlining or marginalia in text. VG/VG

Photograph shows a soldier in 1861, fully-equipped with a Model 1841 "Mississippi" rifle, a Sheffield-style Bowie knife, revolver, militia style drum canteen, box knapsack, blanket roll, and cartridge box.

Photograph shows a soldier in 1861, fully equipped with a Model 1841 “Mississippi” rifle, a Sheffield-style Bowie knife, revolver, militia style drum canteen, box knapsack, blanket roll, and cartridge box.

John Crawford Vaughn was one of the most famous men in Tennessee in the mid-nineteenth century. He was the first man to raise an infantry regiment in the state – and one of the very last Confederate generals to surrender. History has not been kind to Vaughn, who finally emerges from the shadows in this absorbing assessment of his life and military career.

Victory at Manasas

Victory at Manassas

Making use of recent research and new information, Gordon’s biography follows Vaughn to Manassas, Vicksburg and other crucial battles; it shows him as a close friend of Jefferson Davis, and Davis’s escort during the final month of the war. And it considers his importance as one of the few Confederate generals to return to Tennessee after Reconstruction, where he became President of the State Senate.

Vicksburg 1863

Vicksburg 1863

Gordon examines Vaughn’s location on the field of crucial battles; his multiple wounds; the fact that his wife and family, captured by Union soldiers, were the only family members of a Confederate general incarcerated as hostages during the Civil War; and the effect of this knowledge on his performance as a military commander. The book is as valuable for its view of this little understood figure as it is for the light it casts on the culture of his day.

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