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One more such victory, and we shall be undone… Pyrrhus

The Civil War has been famously called a rich man’s war and a poor man’s fight – which is a true complaint about almost every war when examined closely enough – but this book, in conjunction with a good deal of other recently published history, makes a substantial argument that the war was turned, and possibly even won, in the West. The capture of New Orleans and Vicksburg substantially cut the Confederacy in two but battles like Chickamauga saw the union advancing into the South and they may have been defeated but they were not dislodged and their presence allowed them to increase their strength and eventually tip the scale. From the longest bayonet fight in history on the banks of the Mississippi to the turning of the rivers red with blood in Tennessee the days of cavalry charges gave way to the era of trenches and instead of casualties being numbered in the hundreds dead they would now be numbered in the thousands.

The scene now presented was unspeakably grand. The resolute and impetuous charge, the rush of our heavy columns sweeping out from the shadow and gloom of the forest into the open fields flooded with sunlight, the glitter of arms, the onward dash of artillery and mounted men, the retreat of the foe, the shouts of the hosts of our army, the dust, the smoke, the noise of fire-arms—of whistling balls and grape-shot and of bursting shell—made up a battle scene of unsurpassed grandeur... Confederate Brig. Gen. Bushrod Johnson

The scene now presented was unspeakably grand. The resolute and impetuous charge, the rush of our heavy columns sweeping out from the shadow and gloom of the forest into the open fields flooded with sunlight, the glitter of arms, the onward dash of artillery and mounted men, the retreat of the foe, the shouts of the hosts of our army, the dust, the smoke, the noise of fire-arms—of whistling balls and grape-shot and of bursting shell—made up a battle scene of unsurpassed grandeur… Confederate Brig. Gen. Bushrod Johnson

This terrible sound : the battle of Chickamauga Urbana : University of Illinois Press, c 1992 Peter Cozzens ; illustrations by Keith Rocco Chickamauga, Battle of, Ga., 1863 Hardcover. 1st. ed., later printing. xii, 675 p. : ill., maps ; 24 cm. Includes bibliographical references (p. [621]-645) and index. Clean, tight and strong binding with clean dust jacket. No highlighting, underlining or marginalia in text. VG/VG

When North and South met among the desolate mountains of northwestern Georgia in 1863, they began one of the bloodiest and most decisive campaigns of the Civil War. The climactic Battle of Chickamauga lasted just two days, yet it was nearly as costly as Gettysburg, with casualties among the highest in the war.

Majr. Genl. William S. Rosecrans: at the Battle of Murfreesboro, Jany. 2nd 1863 from the Library of Congress

Major Genl. William S. Rosecrans: at the Battle of Murfreesboro, Jany. 2nd 1863 from the Library of Congress

In this study of the campaign, the first to appear in over thirty years and the most comprehensive account ever written on Chickamauga, Peter Cozzens presents a vivid narrative about an engagement that was crucial to the outcome of the war in the West. Drawing upon a wealth of previously untapped sources, Cozzens offers startling new interpretations that challenge the conventional wisdom on key moments of the battle, such as Rosecrans‘s fateful order to General Wood and Thomas’s historic defense of Horseshoe Ridge.

I know Mr. Davis thinks that he can do a great many things that other men would hesitate to attempt. For instance, he tried to do what God had failed to do. He tried to make a soldier out of Braxton Bragg, and you know the result. It couldn't be done... Gen. Joseph Johnston.

I know Mr. Davis thinks that he can do a great many things that other men would hesitate to attempt. For instance, he tried to do what God had failed to do. He tried to make a soldier out of Braxton Bragg, and you know the result. It couldn’t be done… Gen. Joseph Johnston.

Chickamauga was a battle of missed opportunities, stupendous tactical blunders, and savage fighting by the men in ranks. Cozzens writes movingly of both the heroism and suffering of the common soldiers and of the strengths and tragic flaws of their commanders. Enhanced by the detailed battle maps and original sketches by the noted artist Keith Rocco, this book will appeal to all  students of the Civil War and enthusiasts of military history.

It seems to me that the elan of the Southern soldier was never seen after Chickamauga. ... He fought stoutly to the last, but, after Chickamauga, with the sullenness of despair and without the enthusiasm of hope. That 'barren victory' sealed the fate of the Confederacy...   Confederate Lt. Gen. D.H. Hill

It seems to me that the elan of the Southern soldier was never seen after Chickamauga. … He fought stoutly to the last, but, after Chickamauga, with the sullenness of despair and without the enthusiasm of hope. That ‘barren victory’ sealed the fate of the Confederacy… Confederate Lt. Gen. D.H. Hill

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