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Our cause is no less the cause of truth, of honor, and of God now than it was in the day we first took up arms against the barbarous hordes of fanatics and of Puritan and German infidels who have for three years sought to despoil us of our political rights, rob us of our property, destroy our social life, and overturn and crush our altars. The hate of these men has not been abated by the plunder and desolation and bloodshed upon which it has fed, but rather been deepened and intensified. From them, should they succeed, we are to expect nothing but universal confiscation of our property, abject social and personal degredation or death… Leonidas Polk, Lieutenant-General, Commanding, General Orders No.1, Headquarters, Meridian, Mississippi, December 23, 1863

William Joseph Hardee, CSA

William Joseph Hardee, CSA

Great Civil War heroes and their battles New York: Abbeville Press, c 1985      edited and with an introduction by Walton Rawls United States History Civil War, 1861-1865 Campaigns Hardcover. 303 p.: ill. (some col.); 23 x 29 cm. Includes index. Clean, tight and strong binding with clean dust jacket. No highlighting, underlining or marginalia in text. VG/VG

John Bell Hood, CSA

John Bell Hood, CSA

The dramatic history of the War for Southern Independence comes alive in Great Civil War Heroes and their Battles. In this beautifully produced compilation are the biographies of fifty famed commanders from both the union and the Confederacy, accompanied by lifelike portraits and more than seventy full-page battle scenes, including images from Currier & Ives and the treasured Kurz and Allison series.

John Bankhead Magruder, CSA

John Bankhead Magruder, CSA

The new edition of Great Civil War Heroes and Their Battles brings a classic American history book back in stock in conjunction with the 150th anniversary of the start of the Civil War on April 12, 1861. This anniversary edition features an engaging new Preface from author Walton Rawls.

John Hunt Morgan, CSA

John Hunt Morgan, CSA

Each general’s section, in addition to a biography and descriptions of his exploits in the war, lists his major battles, his dates of promotion, his independent field commands, etc. Written when many of these figures were still alive, the biographies are peppered with fascinating first-person anecdotes and recollections that may not otherwise have survived.

John Clifford Pemberton, CSA

John Clifford Pemberton, CSA

Supplementing the text and battle scenes are ordnance drawings identifying the major types of artillery, muskets, rifles, and pistols used by both sides — as well as full-color spreads showing the standard uniforms and insignia of union and Confederate armies. Scattered throughout are colorful vignettes of a soldier’s life and drawings taken from writing paper and envelopes distributed to the union troops. Full-page maps and a detailed chronology of the war complete this enriching volume.

Leonidas Polk graduated from West Point in 1827, along with the future President of the Confederacy Jefferson Davis and fellow officer Albert Sidney Johnston. Called to pursue a religious career, he resigned his commission in the army and over the next thirty years that career would include missionary work and his appointment to the post of Bishop. Beloved not only by his men, but by most southerners a few northerners as well, this rotund man had been an Episcopal Bishop of Louisiana for some twenty years and just recently baptized Generals Joseph E. Johnston and John Bell Hood. A round struck nearby and the third round entered Polk through an arm, passing through his chest and exiting through the other arm. He was dead. Johnston stood over the man who had baptized him earlier in the campaign and cried. One of the few men who had little regard for Confederate officers, and even less for the clergy, was union general William T. Sherman, who in a tersely worded statement sent to Gen. Halleck said, "We killed Bishop Polk yesterday and have made good progress today..."

Leonidas Polk graduated from West Point in 1827, along with the future President of the Confederacy Jefferson Davis and fellow officer Albert Sidney Johnston. Called to pursue a religious career, he resigned his commission in the army and over the next thirty years that career would include missionary work and his appointment to the post of Bishop. Beloved not only by his men, but by most southerners a few northerners as well, this rotund man had been an Episcopal Bishop of Louisiana for some twenty years and just recently baptized Generals Joseph E. Johnston and John Bell Hood. A round struck nearby and the third round entered Polk through an arm, passing through his chest and exiting through the other arm. He was dead. Johnston stood over the man who had baptized him earlier in the campaign and cried. One of the few men who had little regard for Confederate officers, and even less for the clergy, was union general William T. Sherman, who in a tersely worded statement sent to Gen. Halleck said, “We killed Bishop Polk yesterday and have made good progress today…”

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