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Let us form one body, one heart, and defend to the last warrior our country, our homes, our liberty, and the graves of our fathers… Tecumseh

I can find no more apt analogy for the War for Southern Independence than the war the Shawnee waged to keep their tribal lands safe from the colonists. Unfortunately as Tecumseh lamented,  When the legends die, the dreams end; there is no more greatness.

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The Shawnees and the war for America New York: Viking, 2007 Colin G. Calloway Shawnee Indians Wars, 1775-1783 Hardcover. 1st. ed. and printing. xxxvii, 216 p.: ill., maps; 20 cm. Includes bibliographical references (p. 205-207) and index. Clean, tight and strong binding with clean dust jacket. No highlighting, underlining or marginalia in text. VG/VG

Print shows Tecumseh shielding prisoners from another Native American on horseback wielding a tomahawk during the War of 1812; another Native is about to scalp a dead soldier.

Print shows Tecumseh shielding prisoners from another Native American on horseback wielding a tomahawk during the War of 1812; another Native is about to scalp a dead soldier.

Long before the American Revolution, the Shawnees lived in Ohio, hunted in Kentucky, and traveled as far afield as Pennsylvania, Georgia, and Missouri. Settlers, however, sharply curtailed their freedom. With the courage and resilience embodied by their legendary leader Tecumseh, the Shawnee tribe waged a war of territorial and cultural resistance that lasted for more than sixty years. For a time the Shawnees and their allies met colonial forces on nearly equal terms — but their story is of an embattled nation fighting to maintain its cultural and political independence.

Print shows Tenskwatawa, the Shawnee Prophet, and Tecumseh, with other Natives and tipis in the background.

Print shows Tenskwatawa, the Shawnee Prophet, and Tecumseh, with other Natives and tipis in the background.

Here is the account of the early settlers’ drive to occupy the West, the Shawnees’ unwavering defense of their homeland, and the bitter battles that resulted. Here too are the alliances that the Shawnees forged with their Indian neighbors to present a united resistance, as well as instances of cooperation, collaboration, and intermarriage between the opposing forces.

Print shows Col. R.M. Johnson using a pistol to kill Tecumseh during the War of 1812, at the battle of the Thames in Ontario, Canada.

Print shows Col. R.M. Johnson using a pistol to kill Tecumseh during the War of 1812, at the battle of the Thames in Ontario, Canada.

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