Leave a comment

I knew that if the feat was accomplished it must be at a most fearful sacrifice of as brave and gallant soldiers as ever engaged in battle… John Bell Hood

The Richmond campaign of 1862 : the Peninsula and the Seven Days  edited by Gary W. Gallagher  Chapel Hill : University of North Carolina Press, c 2000  Hardcover. xv, 272 p. : ill., maps ; 25 cm. Includes bibliographical references (p. [251]-255) and index. Clean, tight and strong binding with clean dust jacket. No highlighting, underlining or marginalia in text. VG/VG

Slocum's Artillery engaged with the enemy on the Charles City Road. (Seven days fighting) The 16th N.Y. Regt as supports. Troops preparing for battle - infantry lying on ground in foreground, caissons and cannons in background. Wounded being carried off field.

Slocum’s Artillery engaged with the enemy on the Charles City Road. (Seven days fighting) The 16th N.Y. Regt as supports. Troops preparing for battle – infantry lying on ground in foreground, caissons and cannons in background. Wounded being carried off field.

The Richmond campaign of April-July 1862 ranks as one of the most important military operations of the first years of the American Civil War. Key political, diplomatic, social, and military issues were at stake as Robert E. Lee and George B. McClellan faced off on the peninsula between the York and James Rivers.

Photograph from the main eastern theater of war, the Peninsular Campaign, May-August 1862. These photographs reflect McClellan's advance from Yorktown to Fair Oaks, only five miles from Richmond. Some of the sites of the Seven Days' Battles (June 25-July 1) were photographed only after the fall of Richmond in 1865.

Photograph from the main eastern theater of war, the Peninsular Campaign, May-August 1862. These photographs reflect McClellan’s advance from Yorktown to Fair Oaks, only five miles from Richmond. Some of the sites of the Seven Days’ Battles (June 25-July 1) were photographed only after the fall of Richmond in 1865.

The climactic clash came on June 26-July 1 in what became known as the Seven Days battles, when Lee, newly appointed as commander of the Confederate forces, aggressively attacked the Union army. Casualties for the entire campaign exceeded 50,000, more than 35,000 of whom fell during the Seven Days.

Photo shows a makeshift field hospital with wounded soldiers sitting and lying on the ground while some receive care. Includes the straw-hatted Sixteenth New York Infantry who fought at Gaines' Mill on June 27. Most were captured when Confederates overtook the area during the battle of Savage's Station on June 29.

Photo shows a makeshift field hospital with wounded soldiers sitting and lying on the ground while some receive care. Includes the straw-hatted Sixteenth New York Infantry who fought at Gaines’ Mill on June 27. Most were captured when Confederates overtook the area during the battle of Savage’s Station on June 29.

This book offers nine essays in which well-known Civil War historians explore questions regarding high command, strategy and tactics, the effects of the fighting upon politics and society both North and South. The authors have consulted previously untapped manuscript sources and reinterpreted more familiar evidence, sometimes focusing closely on the fighting around Richmond and sometimes looking more broadly at the background and consequences of the campaign.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: