Leave a comment

when politicians and generals lead nations into war, they almost invariably assume swift victory, and have a remarkably enduring tendency not to foresee problems that, in hindsight, seem obvious

generals006

Jefferson Davis’s generals  edited by Gabor S. Boritt  New York : Oxford University Press, 1999  Hardcover. xvii, 217 p., [16] p. of plates : ill. ; 22 cm. Includes bibliographical references (p. 197-213). Clean, tight and strong binding with clean dust jacket. No highlighting, underlining or marginalia in text. VG/VG

generals001

Confederate General P.G.T.Beauregard once wrote that “no people ever warred for independence with more relative advantages than the Confederates.” If there was any doubt as to what Beauregard sought to imply, he later to chose to spell it out: the failure of the Confederacy lay with the Confederate president Jefferson Davis.

generals002

In Jefferson Davis’ Generals, a team of Civil War historians present fascinating examinations of the men who led the South through its bloodiest conflict, focusing in particular on Jefferson Davis’ relationships with five key generals who held independent commands: Joseph E. Johnston, Robert E. Lee, P.G.T. Beauregard, Braxton Bragg, and John Bell Hood.

generals003

Craig Symonds examines the underlying implications of a withering trust between Johnston and his friend Jefferson Davis. And was there really harmony between Davis and Robert E. Lee? A tenuous harmony at best, according to Emory Thomas. Michael Parrish explores how Beauregard and Davis worked through a deep and mutual loathing, while Steven E. Woodworth and Herman Hattaway make contrasting evaluations of the competence of Generals Braxton Bragg and John Bell Hood.

generals004

Taking a different angle on Davis’ ill-fated commanders, Lesley Gordon probes the private side of war through the roles of the generals’ wives, and Harold Holzer investigates public perceptions of the Confederate leadership through printed images created by artists of the day. James M. McPherson’s final chapter ties the individual essays together and offers a new perspective on Confederate strategy as a whole. Jefferson Davis’ Generals provides stimulating new insights into one of the most vociferously debated topics in Civil War history.

generals005

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: