Archive | August 2013

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Major, we didn’t take Washington, but we scared Abe Lincoln like hell… General Jubal Early, CSA

Jubal Early’s raid on Washington  Benjamin Franklin Cooling  Tuscaloosa : University of Alabama Press, 2007, c 1989  Softcover. Originally published: Baltimore, Md. : Nautical & Aviation Pub. Co. of America, c1989. 344 p. : ill., maps ; 23 cm. Includes bibliographical references (p. 281-302) and index. Clean, tight and strong binding with clean dust jacket. […]

Surely, if Mother Nature had been consulted, she would never have consented to building a city in New Orleans.

An unnatural metropolis : wresting New Orleans from nature  Craig E. Colten  Baton Rouge : Louisiana State University Press, c 2005  Hardcover. xiii, 245 p. : ill., maps ; 24 cm. Includes bibliographical references (p. 193-236) and index. Clean, tight and strong binding with clean dust jacket. No highlighting, underlining or marginalia in text. VG/VG […]

There isn’t a wife in the world who has not taken the exact measure of her husband, weighed him and settled him in her own mind, and knows him as well as if she had ordered him after designs and specifications of her own… Charles Dudley Warner

Civil War wives : the lives and times of Angelina Grimke Weld, Varina Howell Davis, and Julia Dent Grant  Carol Berkin  New York : Alfred A. Knopf, 2009  Hardcover. 1st ed. xiv, 361 p. : ill., ports. ; 25 cm. Includes bibliographical references (p. [317]-345) and index. Clean, tight and strong binding with clean dust […]

“Savages may indeed be a formidable enemy to your raw American militia; but upon the king’s regular and disciplined troops, Sir, it is impossible they should make an impression.” – British General Edward Braddock to Benjamin Franklin, 1755, after rejecting proposals from the Ohio Indians that the British and Indians ally and just before departing for the Ohio Valley where he was defeated and killed by French and Indian forces at the Battle of the Wilderness

George Washington’s first war : his early military adventures  David A. Clary  New York : Simon & Schuster, 2011  Hardcover. 1st ed. and printing. xxiii, 351 p. : ill. ; 25 cm. Includes bibliographical references and index. Clean, tight and strong binding with clean dust jacket. No highlighting, underlining or marginalia in text. VG/VG “I […]

You can always tell an old battlefield where many men have lost their lives. The next spring the grass comes up greener and more luxuriant than on the surrounding countryside; the poppies are redder, the corn-flowers more blue. They grow over the field and down the sides of the shell holes and lean, almost touching , across the abandoned trenches in a mass of color that ripples all day in the direction that the wind blows. They take the pits and scars out of the torn land and make it a sweet, sloping surface again. Take a wood, now, or a ravine: In a year’s time you could never guess the things which had taken place there.

The battle of Monroe’s Crossroads : and the Civil War’s final campaign  Eric J. Wittenberg  New York : Savas Beatie, c 2006  Hardcover. xxiv, 336 p. : ill., maps ; 24 cm.  Includes bibliographical references (p. [301]-322) and index.  Clean, tight and strong binding with clean dust jacket. No highlighting, underlining or marginalia in text. […]

‘Do you pray for the senators, Dr. Hale?’ No, I look at the senators and I pray for the country… Edward Everett Hale

Bombast is praised as oratory, compromise is confused with virtue and opportunism is elevated to necessity – the processes by which the United State’s Senate works have not changed in the past two hundred years. Proving once and for all that hindsight is not 20-20 Bordewich’s book credits the men of the day with principles […]

The apparent rulers of the nation are imposing personages: it is by them the mob are influenced; it is they whom the spectators cheer. The real rulers are secreted second-raters; no one cares for them or asks after them, but they are obeyed implicitly and unconsciously by reason of the splendor of those who eclipsed and preceded them. All governments are infested by a class of second-rate men but the America left by Lincoln was absolutely overrun by such men.

Sometimes the shadow of an important man is not only the safest place to be but also the most advantageous. Porter certainly found it so giving up a combat role to become a staff officer which saw him breveted from a lieutenant colonel to a major-general and provided his meal ticket for the rest of […]