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Every attempt to make war easy and safe will result in humiliation and disaster… William Tecumseh Sherman

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The general who marched to hell; William Tecumseh Sherman and his march to fame and infamy  Earl Schenck Miers    Hardcover. Originally published: New York, Knopf, 1951. xxiii, 349, xvii p. maps. 22 cm. Bibliography: p. 329-334. Clean, tight and strong binding with clean dust jacket. No highlighting, underlining or marginalia in text. VG/VG

Gen Sherman reviewing his army in Savannah before starting on his new campaign

Gen Sherman reviewing his army in Savannah before starting on his new campaign

Review of the Artillery of Shermans Corps

Review of the Artillery of Shermans Corps

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Sherman’s march to the sea

Destruction of the depots, public buildings, and manufactories at Atlanta, Georgia, November 15, 1864 The Fourteenth and Twentieth Corps moving out of Atlanta, November 15, 1864.

Destruction of the depots, public buildings, and manufactories at Atlanta, Georgia, November 15, 1864 The Fourteenth and Twentieth Corps moving out of Atlanta, November 15, 1864.

Sherman's March Through South Carolina - Burning of McPhersonville, February 1, 1865

Sherman’s March Through South Carolina – Burning of McPhersonville, February 1, 1865

General Sherman at the Battle of Kennesaw Mountain, Ga.

General Sherman at the Battle of Kennesaw Mountain, Ga.

An angered response to Confederate peace overtures and to the push for reconciliation with the South advanced by the Peace Democrats in 1864. Confederate general Robert E. Lee and president Jefferson Davis (center) stand back-to-back trying to ward off an attack by Northern officers (from left to right) Philip H. Sheridan, Ulysses S. Grant, David G. Farragut, and William T. Sherman. Sheridan points his sword at Lee, saying, "You commenced the war by taking up arms against the Government and you can have peace only on the condition of your laying them down again." Grant, also holding a sword, insists, "I demand your unconditional surrender, and intend to fight on this line until that is accomplished." Lee tries to placate them, "Cant think of surrendering Gentlemen but allow me through the Chicago platform to propose an armistice and a suspension of hostilities . . . " The 1864 Democratic national convention in Chicago advocated "a cessation of hostilities with a view to an ultimate convention of the states, or other peaceable means" to restore the Union. Davis, unarmed with his hands up, agrees, " . . . if we can get out of this tight place by an armistice, it will enable us to recruit up and get supplies to carry on the war four years longer." Farragut threatens with a harpoon, snarling, " rmistice! and suspension of hostilities'.--Tell that to the Marines, but sailors dont understand that hail from a sinking enemy." Sherman, with raised sword, informs Davis, "We dont want your negores or anything you have; but we do want and will have a just obedience to the laws of the United States."

An angered response to Confederate peace overtures and to the push for reconciliation with the South advanced by the Peace Democrats in 1864. Confederate general Robert E. Lee and president Jefferson Davis (center) stand back-to-back trying to ward off an attack by Northern officers (from left to right) Philip H. Sheridan, Ulysses S. Grant, David G. Farragut, and William T. Sherman. Sheridan points his sword at Lee, saying, “You commenced the war by taking up arms against the Government and you can have peace only on the condition of your laying them down again.” Grant, also holding a sword, insists, “I demand your unconditional surrender, and intend to fight on this line until that is accomplished.” Lee tries to placate them, “Cant think of surrendering Gentlemen but allow me through the Chicago platform to propose an armistice and a suspension of hostilities . . . ” The 1864 Democratic national convention in Chicago advocated “a cessation of hostilities with a view to an ultimate convention of the states, or other peaceable means” to restore the Union. Davis, unarmed with his hands up, agrees, ” . . . if we can get out of this tight place by an armistice, it will enable us to recruit up and get supplies to carry on the war four years longer.” Farragut threatens with a harpoon, snarling, ” rmistice! and suspension of hostilities’.–Tell that to the Marines, but sailors dont understand that hail from a sinking enemy.” Sherman, with raised sword, informs Davis, “We dont want your negores or anything you have; but we do want and will have a just obedience to the laws of the United States.”

View of the Bennett House, four miles west of Durham, N.C. The house in which Gen. Joseph E. Johnston surrendered to Gen. W.T. Sherman, April 26, 1865

View of the Bennett House, four miles west of Durham, N.C. The house in which Gen. Joseph E. Johnston surrendered to Gen. W.T. Sherman, April 26, 1865

Blank soldier's discharge certificate, with head-and-shoulders portraits of Abraham Lincoln, Ulysses S. Grant, William Tecumseh Sherman, Philip Henry Sheridan, and George Henry Thomas.

Blank soldier’s discharge certificate, with head-and-shoulders portraits of Abraham Lincoln, Ulysses S. Grant, William Tecumseh Sherman, Philip Henry Sheridan, and George Henry Thomas.

Print showing President Grant sitting at the center of a large table, with several men clustered around, signing the 15th amendment granting that the right to vote cannot be denied on basis of race or color. From left, sitting and standing, are "E. Stanton, H. Greley [i.e., Greeley], S. Colfax, A. Lincoln, R. Small[s], U.S. Grant, Chs. Sumner, W.F. Seward, Lt. Gov. Revels, Fred. Douglass, B.J. [i.e., F.] Butler, [and] W.T. Sherman." Vignettes along sides and bottom show African Americans in military service, at school, on the farm, and voting. A head-and-shoulders portrait of John Brown is hanging on the wall in the background.

Print showing President Grant sitting at the center of a large table, with several men clustered around, signing the 15th amendment granting that the right to vote cannot be denied on basis of race or color. From left, sitting and standing, are “E. Stanton, H. Greley [i.e., Greeley], S. Colfax, A. Lincoln, R. Small[s], U.S. Grant, Chs. Sumner, W.F. Seward, Lt. Gov. Revels, Fred. Douglass, B.J. [i.e., F.] Butler, [and] W.T. Sherman.” Vignettes along sides and bottom show African Americans in military service, at school, on the farm, and voting. A head-and-shoulders portrait of John Brown is hanging on the wall in the background.

Native man, "This is the Noble Red Man", standing on a chest of drawers between Carl Schurz, of the "Interior Department", and General Philip Sheridan, of the "War Department"; a peace pipe extends from his pocket towards Schurz and a tomahawk from another pocket towards Sheridan; General William Tecumseh Sherman stands in the shadow of the doorway behind Sheridan.

Native man, “This is the Noble Red Man”, standing on a chest of drawers between Carl Schurz, of the “Interior Department”, and General Philip Sheridan, of the “War Department”; a peace pipe extends from his pocket towards Schurz and a tomahawk from another pocket towards Sheridan; General William Tecumseh Sherman stands in the shadow of the doorway behind Sheridan.

Print shows a large group of political peddlers trying to sell their goods to Columbia as mistress of the house. Among those shown are Samuel J. Tilden selling "Tribulation Toys", Benjamin F. Butler with "Elastic Politics" suspenders, Ulysses S. Grant, "306" on his watch chain, with a sack of "War Record" and "Old Clo's", Roscoe Conkling with a bag of "Stalwart Stationery", James G. Blaine offering his card "J. Blaine Fancy Goods" with a bag of "Southern Policy [and] Fancy Notions", Thomas Hendricks, Chester A. Arthur, David Davis peddling "D. Davis's Soap will Scour Both Parties", Abram S. Hewitt, William Evarts, Allen G. Thurman with a sack of "Rag Babies", John A. Logan peddling "Logan Bombast", Grover Cleveland with a sack of "Clean Shirts", Thomas Bayard peddling "Dodge Salve" and "Bayards No Policy", John Sherman with "Honest Hosiery", and Winfield Scott Hancock with "Clean Gloves"; dashing up in the background are "Johann Kelly & Co., Samuells Randall & Co., [and] Gen. Sherman U.S.A." Uncle Sam is sitting, in the upper left, with his feet on the railing of the second floor porch.

Print shows a large group of political peddlers trying to sell their goods to Columbia as mistress of the house. Among those shown are Samuel J. Tilden selling “Tribulation Toys”, Benjamin F. Butler with “Elastic Politics” suspenders, Ulysses S. Grant, “306” on his watch chain, with a sack of “War Record” and “Old Clo’s”, Roscoe Conkling with a bag of “Stalwart Stationery”, James G. Blaine offering his card “J. Blaine Fancy Goods” with a bag of “Southern Policy [and] Fancy Notions”, Thomas Hendricks, Chester A. Arthur, David Davis peddling “D. Davis’s Soap will Scour Both Parties”, Abram S. Hewitt, William Evarts, Allen G. Thurman with a sack of “Rag Babies”, John A. Logan peddling “Logan Bombast”, Grover Cleveland with a sack of “Clean Shirts”, Thomas Bayard peddling “Dodge Salve” and “Bayards No Policy”, John Sherman with “Honest Hosiery”, and Winfield Scott Hancock with “Clean Gloves”; dashing up in the background are “Johann Kelly & Co., Samuells Randall & Co., [and] Gen. Sherman U.S.A.” Uncle Sam is sitting, in the upper left, with his feet on the railing of the second floor porch.

Illustration shows a beauty contest where "First Prize" is the "Presidency". The presidential candidates, all dressed as women, are sitting on raised platforms around which men have gathered to admire their beauty. Two men in the lower left appear to be voting for number "1. The Empire State Enslaver"; among those in the running are "2. The same Old Widow from Beanville, 3. The Mulligan Masher from Maine [holding fan labeled] J. Blaine, 4. The Delaware Darling, 5. The Indiana Dumpling [holding fan labeled] J.E. MDonald, 6. The Homespun Houri of Ohio, 7. The Illinois Pet, 10. Utica Immortelle, 11. The Buffalo Girl, 12. The Indiana 'Sun-Flower' [with ribbon labeled] W.S. Holman, 13. The Nation's Ex-Favorite [holding fan labeled] U.S.G., 14. The Pension Ring Pocahontas [with fan labeled] Logan, 15. The Centennial Spinster Ex-Champion de jure, 16. The Free Trade Fairy [with fan labeled] Hewitt, 17. The Ohio Water Lily Ex-Champion de facto, 18. The Pearl of Protection [with fan labeled] Randall, The Sherman Sisters 19. The Tecumseh Twin, 20. The Treasury Twin, 21. The Virtuous Vermonter [with fan labeled] Edmund, [and] 22. The Fat Fairy". Among those depicted are Chester A. Arthur, Benjamin F. Butler, James G. Blaine, Thomas Bayard, Joseph E. McDonald, Allen G. Thurman, Robert Todd Lincoln, Roscoe Conkling, Grover Cleveland, William Steele Holman, Ulysses S. Grant, John Logan, Samuel J. Tilden, Abram S. Hewitt, Rutherford B. Hayes, Samuel J. Randall, William T. Sherman, John Sherman, George F. Edmunds, and David Davis.

Illustration shows a beauty contest where “First Prize” is the “Presidency”. The presidential candidates, all dressed as women, are sitting on raised platforms around which men have gathered to admire their beauty. Two men in the lower left appear to be voting for number “1. The Empire State Enslaver”; among those in the running are “2. The same Old Widow from Beanville, 3. The Mulligan Masher from Maine [holding fan labeled] J. Blaine, 4. The Delaware Darling, 5. The Indiana Dumpling [holding fan labeled] J.E. MDonald, 6. The Homespun Houri of Ohio, 7. The Illinois Pet, 10. Utica Immortelle, 11. The Buffalo Girl, 12. The Indiana ‘Sun-Flower’ [with ribbon labeled] W.S. Holman, 13. The Nation’s Ex-Favorite [holding fan labeled] U.S.G., 14. The Pension Ring Pocahontas [with fan labeled] Logan, 15. The Centennial Spinster Ex-Champion de jure, 16. The Free Trade Fairy [with fan labeled] Hewitt, 17. The Ohio Water Lily Ex-Champion de facto, 18. The Pearl of Protection [with fan labeled] Randall, The Sherman Sisters 19. The Tecumseh Twin, 20. The Treasury Twin, 21. The Virtuous Vermonter [with fan labeled] Edmund, [and] 22. The Fat Fairy”. Among those depicted are Chester A. Arthur, Benjamin F. Butler, James G. Blaine, Thomas Bayard, Joseph E. McDonald, Allen G. Thurman, Robert Todd Lincoln, Roscoe Conkling, Grover Cleveland, William Steele Holman, Ulysses S. Grant, John Logan, Samuel J. Tilden, Abram S. Hewitt, Rutherford B. Hayes, Samuel J. Randall, William T. Sherman, John Sherman, George F. Edmunds, and David Davis.

View of Central Park and Sherman statue from the windows of Hotel Netherland, New York, N.Y.

View of Central Park and Sherman statue from the windows of Hotel Netherland, New York, N.Y.

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