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It affords me the highest satisfaction to bear testimony to the good conduct of all the officers and men of the brigade… Lysander Cutler

Lysander Cutler of Wisconsin

Lysander Cutler of Wisconsin

Bridges built for Reynolds Corps, sketched from Confederate rifle pits.  Confederate camp in foreground, union troops crossing river in background.

Bridges built for Reynolds Corps, sketched from Confederate rifle pits. Confederate camp in foreground, union troops crossing river in background.

On many a bloody field : four years in the Iron Brigade  Alan D. Gaff  Bloomington : Indiana University Press, c 1996  Hardcover. 1st ed. and printing. xviii, 499 p. : map, ill. ; 24 cm. Includes bibliographical references (p. [472]-484) and index. Clean, tight and strong binding with clean dust jacket. No highlighting, underlining or marginalia in text. VG/VG

Identification from file print, sitters [left to right]: Bvt. Lt. Col. Myles Keogh, Maj. Gen. John Buford, Capt. Peter Penn Gaskell, Capt. C.W. Wadsworth, Lt. Col. A.P. Morrow.

Identification from file print, sitters [left to right]: Bvt. Lt. Col. Myles Keogh, Maj. Gen. John Buford, Capt. Peter Penn Gaskell, Capt. C.W. Wadsworth, Lt. Col. A.P. Morrow.

On Many a Bloody Field follows one of the Civil War’s most famous combat organizations — Company B, 19th Indiana Volunteers of the Iron Brigade, in a vivid account of ordinary people thrust into extraordinary circumstances. Alan Gaff follows the men from recruitment through mustering out, from the tedium of camp to the excitement of battle. A close-up view of the experience of war, told from the soldiers’ perspective, often in the words of the men themselves.

Gen. Edward S. Bragg, U.S.A. Commanded the Iron Brigade

Gen. Edward S. Bragg, U.S.A. Commanded the Iron Brigade

Seminary nr. Gettysburg used as a hospital, scene of Reynolds fight with Longstreet the first day

Seminary nr. Gettysburg used as a hospital, scene of Reynolds fight with Longstreet the first day

Gen. Lucius Fairchild, Col. 2nd Wisc Regt

Gen. Lucius Fairchild, Col. 2nd Wisc Regt

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A narrative and a map on cream lined paper accompany the drawing (on the verso). The text reads: The Fall of Reynolds/ Legend/ Buford with four thousand cavalry, met the advance of the enemy on the Cashtown Road and Chambersburg Pike, on the morning of the 1st of July, 1863. Reynolds, who has command of the right wing of the Union Army, came up to the support of Buford, at 10 o’clock A.M. with two brigades of the First Corps, and immediately proceeded to post one of their (Cutter’s)[sic] to the north of the old rail=road bed, and returning, rode towards the other, the Iron Brigade (Meredith’s), which Doubleday, who had command of the First Corps, was leading to action in a piece of wood skirting Willoughby Run, where Archer’s (Rebel) Brigade, which had just crossed the Run was advancing in line of battle. At the moment when one regiment of this brigade, Fairchild’s, accompanied by Doubleday, had entered the wood, and was becoming desperatley [sic.] engaged, Reynolds, with his staff, rode up to the neck of woods in Fairchild’s rear, to examine the ground, and the disposition of the enemy, when he discovered the enemy advancing, and sweeping up on his left. Instantly wheeling to ride back, he received a ball in the back of his neck, from the direction in which he had seen the enemy, and was borne insensible from the field and soon after expired. The enemy was at that time advancing, one brigade (Archer’s) as I have described, and another whole division to the north of the railroad-bed apparently for the purpose of capturing Lidball’s Horse/Battery, posted on the Chambersburg Pike, which the enemy doubtless judged was defended only by cavalry, (and which in reality was, until the arrival of Reynolds,) and which was stubbornly contesting the enemy’s advance. The accompaning sketch will illustrate this description.

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