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William Henry Fitzhugh Lee objected to the phrase that the Confederates fought for what they thought was right. They fought for what they knew was right. They, like the Greeks, fought for home, the graves of their sires, and their native land…

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The Shenandoah Valley Campaign of 1864  edited by Gary W. Gallagher  Chapel Hill : University of North Carolina Press, c 2006  Hardcover. 1st ed. and printing. xxi, 392 p. : ill., maps ; 25 cm. Includes bibliographical references (p. [371]-375) and index. Clean, tight and strong binding with clean dust jacket. No highlighting, underlining or marginalia in text. VG/VG

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Generally regarded as the most important of the Civil War campaigns conducted in the Shenandoah Valley of Virginia, that of 1864 lasted more than four months and claimed more than 25,000 casualties. The armies of Philip H. Sheridan and Jubal A. Early contended for immense stakes. Beyond the agricultural bounty and the boost in morale to be gained with a victory, events in the Valley would affect Abraham Lincoln’s chances for reelection in the November 1864 presidential canvass.

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The eleven essays in this volume reexamine common assumptions about the campaign, its major figures, and its significance. Taking advantage of the most recent scholarship and a wide range of primary sources, contributors examine strategy and tactics, the performances of key commanders on each side, the campaign’s political repercussions, and the experiences of civilians caught in the path of the armies. The authors do not always agree with one another, but, taken together, their essays highlight important connections between the home front and the battlefield, as well as ways in which military affairs, civilian experiences, and politics played off one another during the campaign.

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