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The liberties of our country, the freedom of our civil constitution, are worth defending against all hazards: And it is our duty to defend them against all attacks… Samuel Adams

While most of the illustrations for this post support the Bicentennial outpouring of pride in the history of the founding of the Republic the last one gives an inkling that all was not flag waving and the triumph of unadulterated freedom. The American War for Independence combined the fervor of American patriots who wanted very little more than home rule and the rights of self determination supported by Europeans who saw an opportunity to keep the British engaged on distant battlefields and too busy to interfere in their colonial enterprises. The failure of the Southern War for Independence is that the north had abandoned the principles of patriotism embraced by the Founders of the Republic in favor of nationalism AND that the Europeans no longer had sufficient interest in supporting the South against an enemy [the north] which was not interfering with whatever was left of their colonial interests but which had the power – upon the slightest provocation – to do so.

Henry Knox on horseback with soldiers transporting a disassembled canon on a sled through the snow, winter 1775-76, following his famous capture of artillery at Fort Ticonderoga.

Henry Knox on horseback with soldiers transporting a disassembled canon on a sled through the snow, winter 1775-76, following his famous capture of artillery at Fort Ticonderoga.

In defense of the public liberty : Britain, America, and the struggle for independence, from 1760 to the surrender at Yorktown in 1781  Samuel B. Griffith II  Garden City, N.Y. : Doubleday, 1976  Hardcover. 1st ed. 725 p., [12] leaves of plates : ill. ; 24 cm.  Bibliography: p. [698]-709. Includes Index. Clean, tight and strong binding with clean dust jacket. No highlighting, underlining or marginalia in text. VG/VG

Death of General Montgomery at Quebec

Death of General Montgomery at Quebec

In 1760, George III came to the throne of the British Empire. It was a time of almost unparalleled prosperity, for both England and her devoted colo­nies overseas. No country dared stand against her armed might. In 1781, after a long war that was ruinous both to the economy and to domestic harmony, the Empire yielded independence to thirteen American colonies which had loosely confederated to oppose her and which were themselves on the brink of finan­cial chaos.

U.S. Army-Artillery retreat from Long Island-1776

U.S. Army-Artillery retreat from Long Island-1776

Those twenty-one years of struggle would first force upon the loyal Eng­lish citizens who lived in America the unwelcome notion of independence, and then instill in them the determina­tion to achieve it and defend it to the death. Men who asked only a reason to be loyal to their king found instead a higher loyalty to the ideals of liberty.

Surrender of General Burgoyne at Saratoga N.Y. Oct. 17th. 1777

Surrender of General Burgoyne at Saratoga N.Y. Oct. 17th. 1777

This history of those draws extensively on con­temporary correspondence, diaries, and newspaper accounts to create a vivid picture of events as they seemed to the participants themselves. The words of George Washington, John and Samuel Adams, Benjamin Frank­lin, officers and common soldiers, George III, members of his Cabinet, Parliament, Louis XVI, Comte de Vergennes, and dozens of others com­bine to depict the full spectacle of the birth of a new nation.

Cartoon shows a man with feathered cap labeled "Ameriquain" (representing America) cutting the horns off a cow labeled "Commerce d'Angleterre" (representing British commerce) which is being milked by a Dutchman labeled "Hollandois," two men labeled "Francois" and "Espagnol" (representing France and Spain) are standing toward the rear of the cow holding bowls of milk. In the foreground, on the left, lies the British lion asleep, a small dog is standing on the lion's back urinating. A distraught Englishman labeled "Anglois" is standing to the right of the lion. In the background, across an expanse of water, is a city labeled "Philadelphia," to the right of the city is a ship, the "Aigle" (i.e., Eagle) laid-up in dry dock, Admiral Howe is sitting at a table, out of sight of his flag ship, with his brother General Howe, a keg is on the ground to the right and wine bottles on the ground to the left of the table. Includes an explanation in French printed separately and pasted below the print.

Cartoon shows a man with feathered cap labeled “Ameriquain” (representing America) cutting the horns off a cow labeled “Commerce d’Angleterre” (representing British commerce) which is being milked by a Dutchman labeled “Hollandois,” two men labeled “Francois” and “Espagnol” (representing France and Spain) are standing toward the rear of the cow holding bowls of milk. In the foreground, on the left, lies the British lion asleep, a small dog is standing on the lion’s back urinating. A distraught Englishman labeled “Anglois” is standing to the right of the lion. In the background, across an expanse of water, is a city labeled “Philadelphia,” to the right of the city is a ship, the “Aigle” (i.e., Eagle) laid-up in dry dock, Admiral Howe is sitting at a table, out of sight of his flag ship, with his brother General Howe, a keg is on the ground to the right and wine bottles on the ground to the left of the table. Includes an explanation in French printed separately and pasted below the print.

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