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Out where the world is in the making, Where fewer hearts in despair are aching, That’s where the West begins… Arthur Chapman

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Kearny’s march : the epic journey that created the American southwest, 1846-1847 Winston Groom New York : Alfred A. Knopf, 2011 Hardcover. 1st ed. xiv, 310 p. : ill. ; 25 cm. Includes bibliographical references (p. [283]-294). Clean, tight and strong binding with clean dust jacket. No highlighting, underlining or marginalia in text. VG/VG

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A thrilling re-creation of a crucial campaign in the Mexican-American War and a pivotal moment in America’s history.

In June 1846, General Stephen Watts Kearny rode out of Fort Leavenworth, Kansas, with a thousand cavalrymen of the First United States Dragoons. When his fantastic expedition ended a year and two-thousand miles later, the nation had doubled in size and now stretched from Atlantic to Pacific, fulfilling what many saw as its unique destiny.

The Warner Ranch is a Registered National Historic Landmark and California Historical Landmark #311. It was the focal point for emigrants traveling over the Santa Fe Trail to the California settlements and gold fields from 1844; and it served as a way-station for Butterfield's Overland Mail Company from September 16, 1858, until April, 1861. It was the first well supplied trading post reached by emigrants after the long trek across the southwest deserts. It figures prominently in events incident with the arrival of the Army of the West under command of General Stephen Watts Kearny during the United States war with Mexico and the Battle of San Pasqual which was the sharpest engagement in the conquest of California. During the Civil War, Camp Wright was established on the ranch for the final staging of the California Volunteer Battalion under Colonel James H. Carleton. The buildings, extant, are of adobe brick and hand-hewn timbers put together by mortise and tenon and wood pegs, typical of the early west.

The Warner Ranch is a Registered National Historic Landmark and California Historical Landmark #311. It was the focal point for emigrants traveling over the Santa Fe Trail to the California settlements and gold fields from 1844; and it served as a way-station for Butterfield’s Overland Mail Company from September 16, 1858, until April, 1861. It was the first well supplied trading post reached by emigrants after the long trek across the southwest deserts. It figures prominently in events incident with the arrival of the Army of the West under command of General Stephen Watts Kearny during the United States war with Mexico and the Battle of San Pasqual which was the sharpest engagement in the conquest of California. During the Civil War, Camp Wright was established on the ranch for the final staging of the California Volunteer Battalion under Colonel James H. Carleton. The buildings, extant, are of adobe brick and hand-hewn timbers put together by mortise and tenon and wood pegs, typical of the early west.

Kearny’s March has all the stuff of great narrative history: hardships on the trail, wild Indians, famous mountain men, international conflict and political intrigue, personal dramas, gold rushes and land-grabs. Winston Groom plumbs the wealth of primary documentation – journals and letters, as well as military records – and gives us an account that captures our imaginations and enlivens our understanding of the business of country-making.

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