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Peace, above all things, is to be desired, but blood must sometimes be spilled to obtain it on equable and lasting terms… Andrew Jackson

Cartoon shows a British boarding party routing the crew of the Chesapeake; in a matter of minutes the crew was subdued and the British flag hoisted. The Americans are portrayed as hapless and cowardly.

Cartoon shows a British boarding party routing the crew of the Chesapeake; in a matter of minutes the crew was subdued and the British flag hoisted. The Americans are portrayed as hapless and cowardly.

To the more than casual student of history the question is not why did the Republic that was the United States of America engage in a civil war in 1861 but rather what extraordinary men managed to hold it together as a republic for 80 long years – and why did it finally succumb to the opportunists who wanted to exploit the resources first of the continent and thereafter of the world. Almost every conflict from the Whiskey Rebellion through John Brown’s insurrection of 1859 was part of the dress rehearsal for the conflict that would destroy the Republic and create the nation – none more so than the War of 1812 which is well covered in this volume.

Print shows the naval battle that ensued on Sept. 11, 1814, between American forces commanded by Thomas Macdonough and British forces commanded by Captain George Downie. The Americans emerged victorious and the British retreated to Canada, bringing their northern campaign in the War of 1812 to an end.

Print shows the naval battle that ensued on Sept. 11, 1814, between American forces commanded by Thomas Macdonough and British forces commanded by Captain George Downie. The Americans emerged victorious and the British retreated to Canada, bringing their northern campaign in the War of 1812 to an end.

The civil war of 1812 : American citizens, British subjects, Irish rebels, & Indian allies Alan Taylor New York : Alfred A. Knopf, 2010 Hardcover. vii, 620 p. : ill., maps ; 25 cm. Includes bibliographical references and index. Clean, tight and strong binding with clean dust jacket. No highlighting, underlining or marginalia in text. VG/VG

Prints show British troops advancing across open ground toward the American troops behind earthworks in the background during the Battle of New Orleans; at center foreground, mortally wounded British General Edward Pakenham is held by his officers.

Prints show British troops advancing across open ground toward the American troops behind earthworks in the background during the Battle of New Orleans; at center foreground, mortally wounded British General Edward Pakenham is held by his officers.

In this book historian Taylor tells the story of a war that redefined North America. During the early nineteenth century, Britons and Americans renewed their struggle over the legacy of the American Revolution. Soldiers, immigrants, settlers, and Indians fought in a northern borderland to determine the fate of a continent. Would revolutionary republicanism sweep the British from Canada? Or would the British empire contain, divide, and ruin the shaky American republic?

A view of the bombardment of Fort McHenry, near Baltimore, by the British fleet, taken from the observatory under the command of Admirals Cochrane & Cockburn on the morning of the 13th of Sepr. 1814 which lasted 24 hours, & thrown from 1500 to 1800 shells in the night attempted to land by forcing a passage up the ferry branch but were repulsed with great loss

A view of the bombardment of Fort McHenry, near Baltimore, by the British fleet, taken from the observatory under the command of Admirals Cochrane & Cockburn on the morning of the 13th of Sepr. 1814 which lasted 24 hours, & thrown from 1500 to 1800 shells in the night attempted to land by forcing a passage up the ferry branch but were repulsed with great loss

In a world of double identities, slippery allegiances, and porous boundaries, the leaders of the republic and of the empire struggled to control their own diverse peoples. The border divided Americans — former Loyalists and Patriots — who fought on both sides in the new war, as did native peoples defending their homelands. Serving in both armies, Irish immigrants battled one another, reaping charges of rebellion and treason. And dissident Americans flirted with secession while aiding the British as smugglers and spies.

Print shows the Constitution, in the background, firing on the wreckage of the HMS Guerriere, the last remaining mast is falling, in the aftermath of the battle between the two ships. Includes additional text about the battle and a remarque showing bust portrait of Isaac Hull.

Print shows the Constitution, in the background, firing on the wreckage of the HMS Guerriere, the last remaining mast is falling, in the aftermath of the battle between the two ships. Includes additional text about the battle and a remarque showing bust portrait of Isaac Hull.

During the war, both sides struggled to sustain armies in a northern land of immense forests, vast lakes, and stark seasonal swings in the weather. In that environment, many soldiers panicked as they fought their own vivid imaginations, which cast Indians as bloodthirsty savages. After fighting each other to a standstill, the Americans and the British concluded that they could safely share the continent along a border that favored the United States at the expense of Canadians and Indians. Both sides then celebrated victory by forgetting their losses and by betraying the native peoples.

Print shows the American privateer "General Armstrong" firing on British boats sent from HBM Carnation to capture her.

Print shows the American privateer “General Armstrong” firing on British boats sent from HBM Carnation to capture her.

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