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My sole ambition is to rid Mexico of the class that has oppressed her and give the people a chance to know what real liberty means… Pancho Villa

Orozco and his staff in the camp, including General Pascual Orozco, Alfred Franhe (?) captain, (the only German in the insurgent army), and Estreadio R. Barquez, adjutant of General Orozco

Orozco and his staff in the camp, including General Pascual Orozco, Alfred Franhe (?) captain, (the only German in the insurgent army), and Estreadio R. Barquez, adjutant of General Orozco

The Texas Rangers and the Mexican Revolution : the bloodiest decade, 1910-1920 Charles H. Harris III and Louis R. Sadler Albuquerque : University of New Mexico Press, c 2004 Hardcover. 1st ed., later printing. xiv, 673 p. : ill., maps ; 27 cm. Includes bibliographical references (p. 578-652) and index. Clean, tight and strong binding with clean dust jacket. No highlighting, underlining or marginalia in text. VG/VG

Political execution -- Mexico

Political execution — Mexico

The decade 1910-1920 was the bloodiest in the controversial history of one of the most famous law enforcement agencies in the world – the Texas Rangers. Much of the bloodshed was along the thousand-mile Texas/Mexico border because these were the years of the Mexican Revolution.

Photograph shows Americans including Dr. J.L. Wilson, surgeon in charge of the hospital corps for Mexican president Francisco Ignacio Madero's column, in front of Madero's hacienda, Bustillo during the Mexican Revolution.

Photograph shows Americans including Dr. J.L. Wilson, surgeon in charge of the hospital corps for Mexican president Francisco Ignacio Madero’s column, in front of Madero’s hacienda, Bustillo during the Mexican Revolution.

Harris and Sadler shed new light on this turbulent period by uncovering the clandestine role of Mexican President Venustiano Carranza in the border violence. They document two virtually unknown invasions of Texas by Mexican Army troops acting under Carranza’s orders. Harris and Sadler suggest the notorious “Plan de San Diego,” usually portrayed by historians as a plot hatched in South Texas, was actually spawned in Mexico by Carranza.

Photo shows Emiliano Zapata Salazar (1879-1919), leader of the Mexican Revolution

Photo shows Emiliano Zapata Salazar (1879-1919), leader of the Mexican Revolution

This irredentist conspiracy, which called for the execution of all Anglo males sixteen and older and the establishment of a Hispanic republic, was designed to cause a race war between Hispanics and Anglos. One of Carranza’s goals was to end the support being given by border residents to his rival Pancho Villa. The “Plan de San Diego” caused the governor of Texas to order the Texas Rangers to wipe out the insurgency along the border. This resulted in an estimated 300 Mexican invaders being killed by the Rangers and others under the de facto conditions of war.

Photograph shows Mexican revolutionary leader General Maximo Castillo (1864-1919), who was imprisoned in the U.S. from 1914 to 1916 during the Mexican Revolution.

Photograph shows Mexican revolutionary leader General Maximo Castillo (1864-1919), who was imprisoned in the U.S. from 1914 to 1916 during the Mexican Revolution.

 

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